Your Presentations Next Week

As we approach the end of class (and the Thanksgiving weekend), it’s important that we check in on your site as you prepare to populate it with content (or, in the case of the content that’s already there, evaluate it’s value). It is also a time to strongly consider the presentation of the site itself, and to fine-tune the look & feel, because content is only as good as the site that showcases it. And it’s also crucial, of course, that you consider audience at every juncture as well.

The format for this presentation will be similar to our last, with slides and a group presentation. However at this point you should also be able to walk us through various aspects of your site itself, and be able to answer questions about the content and the look/feel of the site overall. Because of this, we will reserve the end of your presentation for a walkthrough of the site. Prepare one of your team members to “drive” this walkthrough, taking over the projection computer. Map out what it is you want to talk about and highlight, however, so that your presentation remains professional and succinct.

As with last time, you will give both a presentation and hand in a report, signed by all group members.

presentation & report

The Site Idea and its Relationship to Content
–Be as succinct and clear as possible. Start with a one or two-sentence description of the site.
–Succinctly, how does content fulfill that mission.
–In other words: why are you featuring what you’re featuring?

The Content Itself
–What types of content do you see regularly appearing on your site? And why?
–Written pieces: How? Why? What kind?
–Multimedia pieces: How? Why? What kind?
–Interactive pieces: How? Why? What kind?
–Social media: What’s your strategy? Why? How?
–How do you plan on grouping the various content types?
–In other words, what are the various sections or categories on your site?
–How do these categories work to clearly state at a hierarchical level what your site is all about?
–Give five specific examples of content currently on your site and five specific examples of content still to come.

Content and its Relationship to Audience
This is important, so I will bold it: invite some of your audience to preview your site. Get as much feedback as you can from them regarding the content. For this section include bios/info about the people you talked with for the report and give their specific feedback there.
–Who is the audience you are targeting and why? BE SPECIFIC.
–What content do you think they are looking for online, and why would they come to you to get it?
–How did you come to this conclusion?
–When you previewed your site to audience members, what was their reaction to the content?
–How did they feel it could improve?
–What other content did they feel could go in the site?
–What other feedback did they get?

Look & Feel
–Why does your site look the way it does?
–How does your site classify and display content?
–How can a user access the various pieces of content–is there a menu system that makes sense?
–How does the way your site looks compliment the content?

Walkthrough

The walkthrough of your site should highlight the following:
–demonstrate the way that a user would access various content types
–highlight some of the unique ways your site is presenting its content
–show off your site’s look & feel and explain why it works the way it does
–demonstrate the categories your content falls into

Slides

Follow the same process as before in terms of uploading your slides to Flickr and creating a set and slideshow. Your slides should correspond to the major sections of your presentation. Create as many as you see fit.

Link your slideshow and paste your report in the comments of this entry.

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6 responses to “Your Presentations Next Week

  1. slide show:

    DIY Incubator:

    Site Idea and It’s Relationship to Content:

    What is the site’s mission:

    Our primary goal with the DIY Incubator is to document Chicago’s growing DIY scene, provide localized resources for the city’s crafters and foster a sense of community by allowing them to share their stories and advice with others in the community.

    How does the site’s content accomplish the site goals:

    The site’s content document’s Chicago’s DIY scene through coverage of DIY events in the Crafty Events section of the site and profiles of prominent crafters or DIY boutique in the Crafter Q and A section.

    The site’s content provides a local resource for crafters at all levels:

    Prominent crafters or small business owners in Chicago can share their expertise and advice with viewers through the Crafter Q and A section.

    Advanced and Intermediate crafters who are thinking about selling their work can learn about the ins and outs of the business side of crafting through the Business Beat section.

    Beginner, intermediate and advanced crafters can find listings of the craft supply shops, boutiques and events in their neighborhood through the DIY Directory.

    Beginner, intermediate and advanced crafters can also find additional online DIY resources through the site’s Blogroll section .

    Our site also allows crafters to share with the rest of Chicago’s crafting community by uploading photos of their project ideas and DIY inspirations to our Stuff You Like section and Flickr.

    The Content Itself:

    What type of contents do you see regularly appearing on the site and why?

    The site will continuously offer the audience events around Chicago, photos and city/store updates. Because Chicago is a predominant city for crafters, our events page will be plentiful and always changing for readers to check on a regular basis.

    What written pieces will appear on the site? How/Why/What kind?

    DIY Incubator will offer a feature story once a week (at least) which can range from a business profile to a personal profile to a new and innovative project idea. It is important to keep Chicago’s crafters up-to-date with the latest and greatest trends and news. For instance, DIY Incubator has featured solo-crafters, Cindy Tomczyk and Megan Lee Owdom-Weitz as well as a business profile for Mint Boutique.

    Our Business Beat section will nest all stories relating to the business aspect of crafting. As an example, “How Do I Get a Business License?” is presented in the section currently.

    Crafter Q & A offers written (and multimedia) interviews with prominent crafters around the area.

    Crafty Events will continuously be updated, as each week is heavy with crafting events around Chicago year-round.

    Spot On: DIY Trends and Stuff We Like ………..

    Our Blogroll is an easy way for our audience to link to other sites that might peak their interest. As an example, if they are looking for a place to sell their items online they can quickly click on “Etsy” and get directed to the site. That way we can keep a sister-site relationship with other crafting sites, which will make our site accessible.

    Multimedia
    The DIY Incubator features several types of multimedia, including photo essays, video and podcasts. We want to incorporate multimedia to keep the site current and energized. Our audience members are essentially creative people, so to exclude creative multimedia from the site would be ignoring their passion for creating.

    Photography
    So far we’ve included a photo slideshow to accompany the Empty Bottle Feature, a round up photo show of the craftiness at the Obama Rally and photos of our Crafter Q&As. I believe each story has a photographic element if not a slideshow, essentially because crafters are visual people and like to see what they are reading about. We will continue using photographs to accompany stories, or as a photographic essay.

    Video
    We’ve incorporated video into our site so far as a How To program. This is targeting the beginner/intermediate audience who want to know how to do something, and the quickest way is to see it through video.

    We would like to include a video feature story following a crafter in their day-to-day activities. Day in the Life, so to speak. Perhaps when they are preparing for a craft show.

    We also have plans to incorporate a type of Video Project Diary into the site. We will ask our audience to share a video update of a current project, and continue updating until the project is complete.

    Interactive pieces:

    The video project diary is not our only interactive feature. To interact with our audience, we have prototyped several ideas because we are attempting to create or at least strengthen a specific community.

    We would like to implement:
    What would you do with this: we upload a photo from craigslist or an alley of an object and crafters could comment on what their route would be to turn the item into something crafty.

    A forum where crafters could share their own experiences

    A Flickr account where audience members could upload photos of their own projects and tag it diyincubator to create a slideshow of what’s on the minds of crafters.

    Map

    Social media:

    We’ve begun a Twitter account to connect with our audience in real time. So far we have used it to update the community on events occurring in the Chicago DIY scene. It will be an up-to-the moment look at what’s going on in Chicago and surrounding areas that DIYers might like to know about. Sort of a CNNesque ticker.

    How do you plan on grouping various content types?

    Each piece on the website will be posted under a specific category, all of which are listed in a sidebar on the left side of the page and also used as labels at the bottom of each post. To avoid clumping stories together on the home page of the website and to showcase all of the work posted—not just feature—all stories will be visible on the homepage, regardless of content type, and shown by the date posted. However, readers who are looking for the specific category pieces can click on a category on the left side of the homepage to only see all of the pieces in that category.

    What are the various sections or categories on the site?

    -Crafter Q&As: These pieces essentially introduce our readers, the Chicago community of crafters, to each other. We ask them about their backgrounds, how they got started, how they have struggled, how they overcome these struggles, and what advice they could offer for others in their position. We are basically saying to our readers, “Hey this is so-and-so, get to know each other!”

    -Flickr: We have included some colorful, engaging slideshows showcasing what we have seen around the Chicago area (such as the crafty garb seen at the Obama rally in Grant Park) and also the works of local designers and crafters. These add some color and life to the site and break up some of the longer written pieces included.

    -Multimedia: This section will include photo slideshows with audio played over them, podcasts that feature discussions with local businesses and crafters, and videos that serve as multimedia packages (audio layered over a mix of photo and video and graphics).

    -DIY Directory: With lists of craft businesses divided up by neighborhoods and areas, we can provide our audience with resources to help them develop their skills and connections within the community.

    -Crafty Events: We’ll attend some “crafty events,” like markets, fairs, and festivals, and talk to vendors about their products. Each post will also include information about what the event is all about and when the next ones will be.

    -Spot On: DIY Trends: For this section, we’ll scope out any trends we see developing in the community, like on Etsy or specifically in Chicago. As far as goods in the craft scene go, trends are very important for our audience to pay attention to, to see how they can either tap into that trend or stand out amidst it.

    -Features: For the Features section, posts will be longer written pieces that might not fit into any other section. These could include stories about issues in the community. Also, many of the longer pieces labeled under other categories could be labeled as features, too.

    How do these categories work to clearly state at a hierarchical level what your site is all about?

    We have shaped the pieces in each category to be targeted at both beginner and expert crafters looking to create and expand their own businesses and skills. The features and Q&A’s are the most prominent posts on the website, as it shows that DIY Incubator is most interested in reaching out to the community and making them the main focus of our site. How can we service them best? By giving them expert advice on how to market themselves, get business licenses, get sold at local retailers, etc. Also, it’s incredibly important for us to connect the dots for them, by introducing them to other designers and crafters in their Chicago community they can turn to for advice, support, and organizing.

    Give five examples of content currently on the site.

    -“A minute at Mint”: This is a crafter Q&A where DIY Incubator talked with a sales associate at Mint, a boutique in Lincoln Park that sells handmade goods from local designers. The Q&A focuses on how the business stresses the importance of buying locally and how crafters can tap into this area—selling their goods at local retailers as well as just on their own.

    -“Handmade market ‘sustainable crafterness”: This post highlights a local craft event in Chicago that is an important asset for crafters starting their own business. DIY Incubator was there to meet local crafters and give a first-hand account as to how these markets work and operate. We also listed upcoming dates for crafters looking to get involved.

    -“Tease: 50 Inspired T-Shirt Transformations”: This is listed under our “Stuff We Like” section, as a review of a book by a crafter about interacting with the craft community. Our review is a short, quick piece that gets to the point and shows how we liked the book and what it has to offer our audience.

    -“Obama Gets Crafty”: What was on everyone’s minds in Chicago on Election Day? Obamarama! We figured we could use this to our advantage and post a piece with an angle on the election that spoke to our readers. DIY Incubator found a few of the best Obama buttons on Etsy, a popular crafter site.

    -“Business Beat: How do I get a business license?”: This is an example of how we want to offer pure information and expert advice for our audience who are looking to start their own business and don’t quite know where to start. We realized there are numerous steps to starting a business, so we broke it down. This is the first installment where we found all of the information necessary for getting a business license—which is on at least 6 different websites—and conglomerated it into one step-by-step process. One-stop shopping, basically.

    Give five examples of future content:

    Holiday Craft Fair events:

    From November through mid- December there will be a number of craft fairs throughout Chicago and these events allow people to connect with others interested in DIY. We feel that by covering these events it gives us the opportunity to tap into this sense of community. We would feature podcasts of vendor interviews and video coverage of the events in addition to blog posts so that our content would cover the multiple aspects of the event and viewers would have the option of finding out about the event in multiple formats.

    Handmade Nation:

    We would run a feature on the upcoming documentary (and recently released book) Handmade Nation that is coming out in December. One of the reasons that we’ve taken an interest in this is because not many films cover the crafting movement. This feature would allow us to explore some of the subversive and political qualities that can draw people to DIY and show viewers how DIY can encompass much more than just a knitting project.

    Business Beat: Is This the Time to Be Your Own Boss?:

    This idea came from Mayor Daley’s announcement that there could be numerous job cuts over the next year. With this in mind, would this be the right time for advanced crafters to consider starting up their own business if they get laid off from their job? Local small business owners would weigh in on the basic considerations of starting up a business and also look at the additional things to consider when becoming your own boss when the economy is tough.

    Eco-friendly Crafting :

    This feature would showcase some of the innovative crafters that have incorporated eco-friendly practices into their crafting. It would feature the innovative work from local businesses like Re-Conceived and Five Accessories. The article would show viewers how to find inspiration in re-usable goods and how to make their crafting practices more sustainable.

    Crafter Podcasts:

    This feature would allow local crafters who as a side hobby (not business owners) to share their crafting stories with the rest of the community. We would set up something through drop i.o. and they could call in and leave a message about a particular crafting theme that is chosen every two weeks. This would provide another social element to the site that would allow crafters to participate and have their own personal stories featured on the site as well.

    Content and it’s Relationship to Audience

    Who is the audience you are targeting and why?

    Our main demographic is women based in Chicago, between the ages of 18 -35 who craft as a hobby or as a business venture and whose crafting aesthetic is urban, modern and youthful. We are targeting crafters of all levels from those who are starting out to those who are selling their crafts (but we are gearing an amount of content towards intermediate and advanced crafters). We are targeting this demographic because that this is a niche that isn’t necessarily being represented. There are plenty of DIY sites out there, but there aren’t very many sites that are geared towards the DIY scene in a localized way and we wanted to provide Chicago crafters with content that is geared specifically towards them.

    What content do you think that they are looking for online, why would they come to you for it?

    In speaking with local crafters over the semester, we’ve found that a number of them are looking for a one-stop resource where they can find out about local DIY events and links to other DIY websites – one thing that was mentioned more than once is that it is a nuisance to have to search the web for crafting information. Crafters would come to the DIY Incubator because our site provides a number of links to additional DIY content through our Blogroll and we also feature up to date information on upcoming DIY events through Twitter. In addition to that, we show them all of the DIY related supply shops and boutiques organized by neighborhood in our DIY Directory. Instead of having to search all over the internet, our site would provide them with the information that they are looking for.

    Another thing that intermediate and advanced crafters are looking for is a source for local business advice especially those who are looking to eventually start selling their products. They might like to know what area boutiques could sell their goods on consignment or how to go about getting a business license and they would come to the DIY Incubator because we feature extensive information on the business aspects of crafting through our Crafter Q and A and Business Beat sections.

    How did we come to this conclusion:

    We came to this conclusion through feedback from crafters and business owners that we’ve spoken to over the semester and from advice from the last panel.

    Some of the Crafters that have given us feedback:

    Abi Stokes, 21, Columbia College Poetry Student

    Abi has been crafting since she was young and she learned it from her mother who was an ‘avid seamstress’. She grew up in a home where crafting was obviously encouraged and has always been into working with textiles. Her projects typically involve sewing, quilting, and crocheting. She though she doesn’t currently sell her work, she is considering it at some point in the future. Some of the DIY publications that she reads are Readymade, Make, and Craft magazine. She enjoys going to as many DIY events as she can, especially craft fairs like Renegade and depart-ment.

    Abi’s Feedback:

    Reaction to content – she really liked how there was in depth content on the business end of crafting because she hasn’t found to many sources that are geared towards the DIY demographic. She also like how there was information about different supply shops and boutiques throughout the city. Abi is from Portland and is still learning her way around Chicago, so she felt that this a helpful resource to find new places where she could pick up supplies.

    How did she feel if could improve – she felt that some aspects of the site could be easier to navigate through. She felt that the site was very comprehensive in terms of content but in visiting the site for the first time she felt that it could be a little confusing to find what you are looking for. She felt that by tagging content, this would help to make information more accessible to viewers.

    What other content did she feel could go on the site – the only suggestion that she made (since we already plan to incorporate social and multimedia elements) was to think about adding a forum where crafters could exchange advise on crafting, etc…)

    Morgan Reed, 21-year-old Chicago resident. Fine arts major @ Columbia College. Craft hobbyist.

    Morgan Reed has considered herself to be an artist for over six years, and was always curious about crafting. She just began crafting this past May when she moved in with myself and our other roommate Peri who inspired her to tune into her crafty side.

    She has recently started creating clothing out of old fabrics and clothes. For instance she turned a large piece of drapery into a shapeless and hip shirt the other week. She also, like Peri, has gotten into making feather hair accessories…we have feathers all over our house. She’s been talking about making felt lately, and has been researching how to do it (it involves wool.) She’s also really interested in making her own jewelry and is looking for a class to attend to further her interests at home. So … her goals are personal to her, she isn’t interested in selling any of her creations in the near future.

    As far as crafting publications online, she said she doesn’t normally go to any. She does however peek at Venus from time to time and stumbled over BurdaStyle recently. She picked up the T-shirt book that Megan featured earlier this semester.

    As far as DIY events, she always has intentions of making it out to events but since she works and has night classes she rarely makes it any.

    After she navigated her way through the site she commented on the Flickr account being a nice touch. She also noticed our Twittr account and mentioned that adding community event updates was a great way to utilize the feature (though she has never heard of Twittr before.) She added that the Google map was a really nice touch and that it its helpful to visualize where storefronts were located around the city.

    She said the site was different than a lot of other craft sites because it seemed to be more story-based rather than short blurbs. However, this was a criticism of hers as well…she suggested keeping the long, most recently added articles hidden in their column of the web site and making the shorter/blurbier articles visible to first-time viewers. “If the content is too long,” she said, “it might scare some viewers away.” She also critiqued the blog-look of the site and questioned whether it could steer away from that look or if we wanted it to appear like a blog.

    She said she’s interested to see more content on the site – and would like to see a “project” column including crafters, their current projects, tutorials and maybe photo-updates.

    She used to be a graphic designer, so most of her criticism for the site was on it appearance. She said a few tweaks to make the site appear more like a web site rather than a blog would really make the site shine.

    Stephanie Dean 21, Columbia College student

    Stefanie Dean is a Columbia College student majoring in Graphic Design. She considers herself to be an intermediate crafter, spends hours making crafts and is always on the look out for new ideas.

    – What is their reaction to the site

    It’s a little rough around the edges, but it looks pretty good. She liked the map, especially. She liked the links within the articles, and that we included many photos.

    – How did they feel that it could improved

    More content
    Categories on every page
    Title of each page prominent at the top (forgets where she navigates)
    Clicked on color to change color of link once clicked
    Too much stuff on the side, has to scroll

    – What other content did they feel could go in the site

    More actual crafting stuff
    More photos of finished projects to pull ideas from

    – What other feedback did they give

    Stefanie would never listen to a podcast. The only multimedia she would use would be the photos and the videos. “I would rather just watch a video and listen to it that way. I don’t download it to my iPod,” Stefanie says.

    Would definitely tag photos of her projects and share with others.

    Would look at what other people were talking about on the forum, but probably wouldn’t post herself.

    Look & Feel

    –Why does your site look the way it does?

    The design of our site appeals to our audience of creative female craft makers. The header image is an assortment of fabrics, a material commonly used in craft making. The background also resembles a textile pattern, and its dark gray color contrasts with the white content box and makes it stand out on the page. The pink color of the navigation gives the site a feminine touch, which should please our predominantly female audience.

    –How does your site classify and display content?

    The content is displayed vertically in the center of the page, with the articles arranged chronologically by post date. The home page includes the most recent articles from all categories. Clicking on one of the category links in the left sidebar brings up a page where only stories from the chosen category are listed. Links to our site’s interactive pages are arranged horizontally below the header image. When a user clicks on one of these links, the left sidebar remains visible but the articles from the content area are replaced with new content specific to each page.

    –How can a user access the various pieces of content–is there a menu
    system that makes sense?

    Users have two ways of choosing content. Depending on how they want to sort the content, they can either click on a category link in the left sidebar, or they can click on one of the content tags that appearbelow each post.

    The categories in the sidebar describe the eight types of articles that regularly appear on our site. Users can click on a category if they only want to read a certain type of article, perhaps only business pieces or only trend stories. The tags specifically describe the subject matter within a particular article, and they are not restricted to any one article type. Clicking a tag below an article opens a page containing all the articles we’ve written about that subject, such as stationary. The tag page for stationary could include multiple article types (business, trend, etc.), but all the articles would be related in some way to stationary.

    –How does the way your site looks compliment the content?

    The site is well organized and has a simple design so that the content is easy to find. The headings are large and displayed in a basic sans-serif font so that they are easy for users to read. The plain white background highlights the content within and is not distracting.

  2. Go!Chicago’s Slide Show:

  3. Go! Chicago is a website developed to meet the needs of young music lovers in Chicago, specifically those ages 16-20, who don’t know where to find their favorite band or venue.

    But, what makes our website unique is the amount of multimedia we have incorporated into our site and our ability to communicate the importance of our site idea and its content to our users.

    We have accomplished this by integrating blogs and social media into our website by using Twitter, Flickr photo sharing and videos so that our users feel a sense of community that is inherent to the music scene in Chicago.

    In addition to our social media, we also write blogs about new music releases our favorite artists coming through town and hot spots we love. But our content is not one-sided and in order to build this website into a social network we have included various reply features to allow our audience to communicate directly with us or amongst each other, making this less of an informative website and more of a social media website.

    One reply feature and form of interaction that we have already a built-in is a comments section for each published story. This provides readers an opportunity to give feedback and ask questions. Our web editor has been positioned to monitor all activity on that end on a daily basis.

    Go!Chicago features a variety of unique content updated regularly to the Web site. Our main focus is on print-based articles, separated into five sub-sections: “Artist of the Month”, “Hot Spot Reviews”, “New Music Reviews”, “Upcoming Shows” and “Venue of the Month.”

    A new item is be added into each category at least once per week, with the exception of the “Artist and Venue of the Month” sections, which is updated once per month. Our most crucial content comes from “Hot Spot and New Music Reviews”.

    Besides written content, Go!Chicago will expand to other forms of multimedia to attract our key demographic. The use of pod casts has been set as a priority, as will videos and Twitter. Currently, all three are slowly being phased in, with the plan of a more aggressive strategy by the launch date.

    One of our future goals is to add MySpace and Facebook pages. This cross-promotion will provide further interaction to our key demographic. Go!Chicago also takes use of Google Maps to help readers find local hot spots, and we also offer a extensive links section to valuable Web sites tailored to all ages.

    Go!Chicago’s categories are easily accessible via the top navigation bar, and when clicked, displays the latest stories from each section. We feel this kind of simplicity is needed so a user does not become lost or entangled in our site.

    Examples of content include interviews with bands, such as “Stars” and “Frontier Brothers” and reviews of hot spots such as The Beat Kitchen and the Metro. We also are offering an introductory pod cast but will refocus its objective in the immediate future.

    We have plenty of ideas for delivering more content, including interviews with up-and-coming bands, exclusive pod casts incorporating band’s music, and interactive features letting fans rate local bands.

    Content and it’s relationship to our audience is also important in maintaining a website that caters to the under 21 music fans and in order to meet a larger audience we have expanded our target audience to different types of people, still under 21.

    Specifically, the audience for the site will generally fall under one or more of these three categories: Local music connoisseurs, local show goers, and online entertainment seekers.

    Examples:

    Local music connoisseur: Joe Strakis, 23, Music major at Columbia

    He was very impressed with the site as is and said he would mostly be concerned with updates. He wants constant updates.

    He liked the streaming quality and the video right below it.
    “I look for news updates on bands that I would want to see.” He doesn’t want the site to be cluttered up with too many bands but suggested a genre section could help with that.

    Local show-goer: Grace Junge, 20

    She thought it was very well put together and easy to use. She said she would use the site to find venues to go to and who is playing where. Since she is familiar with the underage music scene, she also suggested other places to add to the site such as Heaven Gallery, Subterranean, and The Bottom Lounge.
    This is the main type of person we want to bring to the site, someone who is familiar with the underage scene and able to spread the word. We also need to try to get these types of people involved with the site’s community by going out and taking pictures at shows and whatnot.

    Online entertainment seeker: Cory Fritts, 19, DeVry

    This would be a casual user of the site who is less involved with the local music scene, but still interested in bands from the area. He would be more involved with the content on the site rather than places to go.

    This is the type of person we could have doing on the scene reviews.

    What our audience is looking for:

    * The typical audience of GoChicago will also be visiting places like Facebook.com/Myspace.com, iTunes, Purevolume, Metromix, Chicagoist, Pitchfork, mpShows, Ticketmaster, and other online Chicago media outlets.
    * They want to know where to go to shows, what new bands are up-and-coming, and to be able to contribute to the website itself.
    * Entertainment is a large part of popular content these days. If we were able to entertain and interact with the audience, they would certainly stick around.

    Why they are looking for this info:

    Younger crowds are drawn to online entertainment that is highly interactive and can be personal. It would have to be less newsy and more fun, but still informational.

    Reactions to the site:

    Many of the viewers were very impressed with the site. They said they would visit the site as long as it was updated. It is important to have community involvement and interaction because this will not only create excitement with the users, but it will keep bringing them back to see if their friends added anything about any shows, or what people thought of the scene.

    How can it improve technically:

    * Label the bands by genres.
    * “Zazz it up a bit.” The website looks a little plain. We should try to make it look less blog-ish and more professional.
    * Web address is of utmost importance. Since we can’t do GoChicago.com we need something else easy to remember.

    What content could we add:

    * Adding more places to go, and having more details about those places.
    * Also, it needs to be updated more than just once a month for musicians and artists in order to keep an audience.

    More feedback:

    * They enjoyed the streaming music and video quality.
    * It looks too “PureVolume-ish” right now.
    * There was a lot of great feedback, and not a lot of negative feedback. It was hard to really get ideas on how to improve it, which, hopefully, means we are on the right track.

    After better defining our audience, revising our content and opening our website to social media and interactive features like MP3’s, video, Twitter, Flickr and pod casts, we have compiled a website that has the look and feel of what we think meets the needs of our all-ages audience.

    But what makes the look and feel of the stories and article we post unique is what we ask our reporter to do in addition to getting the story. Besides the quotes we also want the reporter to take pictures of the band and venue, tweet their surrounding and if possible asks the band for MP3’s to add to our website. Again, besides the color pallet and the font that we chose for our site, we want the user to not only read the articles but listen, view pictures and find links to anything they want when it comes to finding their favorite music or venues in Chicago, also with the option of letting us know what they want to see next.

    Finally, after we launch our ultimate goal is to make this site more than a music review and informative site, but make it more of an online music community for Chicagoans to participate in. Complete with venue options and in-depth stories, but also pictures and video for viewing, music and pod casts for audio and of course all means of feedback for the social media community aspect.

  4. GROUP 3:

    Group 3
    Meha Ahmad, Melody Gordon, Cristina Aguirre, Bertha Serrano, Juan Anguiano

    The Site Idea

    Idea: This site highlights Chicago’s cultural dessert scene and teaches amateur bakers how to do it themselves!
    Exposing Baking is a site for the average amateur bakers, the ones who want to move beyond the every day cupcakes and chocolate chip cookies and want to try something more exotic and diverse. In the city of Chicago, we’ve got dozens and dozens of bakeries that highlight pastries and desserts from every culture. There are staples like Pompeii Bakery in Little Italy or the South Asian Tahoora in Devon. The social melting pot in Chicago aids in highlighting the culinary delights and truly diverse foods of different cultures. And while we pay homage to the great bakeries and innovative bakers of Chicago, we are a site that teaches the nonprofessionals how to make it themselves.
    Exposing baking Chicago features many recipes now and we hope for it to feature hundreds in the future. There are how-to guides, podcasts and videos that step-by-step show the audience how easy they can become an international baker, quick tips and holiday ideas. For other inspiring ideas or a quick shop-stop, we’ve also highlighted the city’s most popular cultural bakeries.
    We’re featuring what we’re featuring because lots of bakeries in Chicago have gotten a lot of attention—Molly’s Cupcakes and Swirlz, to name a few—but the cultural bakeries shouldn’t be overlooked. They offer variety in a vanilla-or-chocolate dessert world. We think people are interested in finding different things to eat; they just don’t know where to look or what’s good.

    The Content Itself

    Some of the content regularly appearing on our site are photos (and slideshows from Flickr), podcasts, maps, articles and recipes. The photos will document the variety of bakeries we visit as well as the different ethnic pastries we have to correspond with the recipes. The interactive map is available to inform visitors where unique bakeries are around them. Articles are, again, there to inform visitors about unique bakeries, as well as get a “behind-the-scenes” look at some of these bakeries to see where they get their ideas from and why they are so successful. Bakers that allow us access in the kitchen are expected to give “tips of the trade” to our nonprofessional bakers. The recipes are there for visitors to use and share at their will.
    Written Pieces:
    Our website divided the written content into two tabs at the top called “What’s Cookin’” and “Sweet Holiday Ideas”. Categories on the side all contain written content for visitors to browse. “What’s Cookin’” contains our news articles about happenings in the baking community. For example, the Sweet Misgivings article is profiling a local bakery that gives disabled and homeless people a second chance. “Sweet Holiday Ideas” will feature only recipes and decorating tips for upcoming holidays. This differs from Quick and Easy Simple Recipes in our category because this section features year around general recipes. Exposing the world of baking gives our audience a look at how some of our featured, unique bakeries got started and what their special niche is in the baking community. “Tips and Tricks” feature simple how-to’s as far as quick decoration and other baking basics.

    Multimedia Pieces:
    To incorporate multimedia into our site, we have included a tab for podcasts and photos from our Flickr account can be seen in our sidebar. The podcasts are short clips that feature how-to’s that are better understood by watching rather than reading about them and cooking events that we attend, like the children’s cooking class, Cooking Rocks!. Photos are from bakeries that we have featured to show off their unique pastry arts as well as again, events that we attend.
    Interactive Pieces:
    To make our site more “User Friendly,” we have added a map of all the Chicago bakeries we have visited (and recommend) and ones we plan on visiting in the future in the form of a Google Map. This map, located in the “Chicago Bakeries” tab, pinpoints where these shops are and can give detailed directions as to how to get there from where ever the user is starting at. We feel that it’s not enough to give just an address to a business when we can easily show our audience exactly how to get there. Within the next few weeks, we hope to incorporate a way for our users to submit their own recipes and have them posted on the site without having to go through our e-mail first. We also have a calendar posted in our side bar which will soon be able to give users information about up-coming events.
    Social Media:
    As for social media, we have added a Twitter account to our site that allows users to tweet each other instead of going through a message board. We find this to be more effective because users who have a question or concern can almost instantly receive a response either from Exposing Baking Chicago or from a peer.

    Look and Feel

    -The website looks the way it does for many reasons. When the visitor comes to the site we want them to see that it’s a baking site. The site of the cake at the top of the page clearly shows that. There are easy to use tabs that visitors can easily navigate through to search for content on our site.
    -We classify and display the content using different tabs on the site for example a contact us tab, Chicago bakeries tab, about us tab, and recent articles can be found at the top of the page right below our title.
    -There are easy to find tabs at the top of the page that can help the users navigate through the tab. Once a visitor clicks on the tab other categories appear making it easier for the visitor to find what he or she was looking for.
    -Our site looks like a baking site which is what we are and what are content is. We pride ourselves in providing different kinds of information on the baking community in Chicago and the look of our site compliments that idea very well.

    Audience:

    The audience we’re targeting are baking beginners who want to be exposed to baking and want to develop their skills and creativity because we are a beginner’s site. While our audience includes any age group, we are targeting 18-35 year-olds, male or female who like to bake once in a while. Our audience wants to learn tips and tricks and they want to get to know the baking world in Chicago.

    They look for quick and easy recipes, how to’s, videos and baking tips. They would come to our site because we offer all of the above.

    Cristina Franco
    She is a student at St. Xavier University studying psychology. She likes to bake when she has time and mostly on the holidays or on special celebrations. She said the
    the page it drew her attention because it looked organized and appealing.

    “The first thing was the cake, it basically said what the page was about without words,” she said. “The colors in the page were very nice and the over all design was very creative.”

    “Something that might help improve this page would probably be to make some of the letters a little bit bigger,” she said. “Some of the links were very small and they might stand out better if they would be bold.”

    Raquel Torres
    She goes to Kendall College and she’s studying hotel management. She hopes to have her own steakhouse one day.

    “At first glance, it’s very nice! I like the home page a lot.”

    “I think having baking tips and recipes is a fantastic idea! Although I couldn’t check any of them out.”

    But I think what would make it even better is if you divided the bakery locations by their specialty, for example Molly’s Cupcakes, best cupcakes in Chicago, and then have a section for wedding cakes, theme cakes, cookies, and like Bittersweet is for fabulous desserts.

    I really like the idea that you focus on local businesses and give background info.

    Maybe have a section of top 10 recipes for the holidays

    Add a section of “healthy baking” for those that are health conscious? Like fat free baking, or low carb baking.

    Group 3
    Meha Ahmad, Melody Gordon, Cristina Aguirre, Bertha Serrano, Juan Anguiano

    The Site Idea

    Idea: This site highlights Chicago’s cultural dessert scene and teaches amateur bakers how to do it themselves!
    Exposing Baking is a site for the average amateur bakers, the ones who want to move beyond the every day cupcakes and chocolate chip cookies and want to try something more exotic and diverse. In the city of Chicago, we’ve got dozens and dozens of bakeries that highlight pastries and desserts from every culture. There are staples like Pompeii Bakery in Little Italy or the South Asian Tahoora in Devon. The social melting pot in Chicago aids in highlighting the culinary delights and truly diverse foods of different cultures. And while we pay homage to the great bakeries and innovative bakers of Chicago, we are a site that teaches the nonprofessionals how to make it themselves.
    Exposing baking Chicago features many recipes now and we hope for it to feature hundreds in the future. There are how-to guides, podcasts and videos that step-by-step show the audience how easy they can become an international baker, quick tips and holiday ideas. For other inspiring ideas or a quick shop-stop, we’ve also highlighted the city’s most popular cultural bakeries.
    We’re featuring what we’re featuring because lots of bakeries in Chicago have gotten a lot of attention—Molly’s Cupcakes and Swirlz, to name a few—but the cultural bakeries shouldn’t be overlooked. They offer variety in a vanilla-or-chocolate dessert world. We think people are interested in finding different things to eat; they just don’t know where to look or what’s good.

    The Content Itself

    Some of the content regularly appearing on our site are photos (and slideshows from Flickr), podcasts, maps, articles and recipes. The photos will document the variety of bakeries we visit as well as the different ethnic pastries we have to correspond with the recipes. The interactive map is available to inform visitors where unique bakeries are around them. Articles are, again, there to inform visitors about unique bakeries, as well as get a “behind-the-scenes” look at some of these bakeries to see where they get their ideas from and why they are so successful. Bakers that allow us access in the kitchen are expected to give “tips of the trade” to our nonprofessional bakers. The recipes are there for visitors to use and share at their will.
    Written Pieces:
    Our website divided the written content into two tabs at the top called “What’s Cookin’” and “Sweet Holiday Ideas”. Categories on the side all contain written content for visitors to browse. “What’s Cookin’” contains our news articles about happenings in the baking community. For example, the Sweet Misgivings article is profiling a local bakery that gives disabled and homeless people a second chance. “Sweet Holiday Ideas” will feature only recipes and decorating tips for upcoming holidays. This differs from Quick and Easy Simple Recipes in our category because this section features year around general recipes. Exposing the world of baking gives our audience a look at how some of our featured, unique bakeries got started and what their special niche is in the baking community. “Tips and Tricks” feature simple how-to’s as far as quick decoration and other baking basics.

    Multimedia Pieces:
    To incorporate multimedia into our site, we have included a tab for podcasts and photos from our Flickr account can be seen in our sidebar. The podcasts are short clips that feature how-to’s that are better understood by watching rather than reading about them and cooking events that we attend, like the children’s cooking class, Cooking Rocks!. Photos are from bakeries that we have featured to show off their unique pastry arts as well as again, events that we attend.
    Interactive Pieces:
    To make our site more “User Friendly,” we have added a map of all the Chicago bakeries we have visited (and recommend) and ones we plan on visiting in the future in the form of a Google Map. This map, located in the “Chicago Bakeries” tab, pinpoints where these shops are and can give detailed directions as to how to get there from where ever the user is starting at. We feel that it’s not enough to give just an address to a business when we can easily show our audience exactly how to get there. Within the next few weeks, we hope to incorporate a way for our users to submit their own recipes and have them posted on the site without having to go through our e-mail first. We also have a calendar posted in our side bar which will soon be able to give users information about up-coming events.
    Social Media:
    As for social media, we have added a Twitter account to our site that allows users to tweet each other instead of going through a message board. We find this to be more effective because users who have a question or concern can almost instantly receive a response either from Exposing Baking Chicago or from a peer.

    Look and Feel

    -The website looks the way it does for many reasons. When the visitor comes to the site we want them to see that it’s a baking site. The site of the cake at the top of the page clearly shows that. There are easy to use tabs that visitors can easily navigate through to search for content on our site.
    -We classify and display the content using different tabs on the site for example a contact us tab, Chicago bakeries tab, about us tab, and recent articles can be found at the top of the page right below our title.
    -There are easy to find tabs at the top of the page that can help the users navigate through the tab. Once a visitor clicks on the tab other categories appear making it easier for the visitor to find what he or she was looking for.
    -Our site looks like a baking site which is what we are and what are content is. We pride ourselves in providing different kinds of information on the baking community in Chicago and the look of our site compliments that idea very well.

    Audience:

    The audience we’re targeting are baking beginners who want to be exposed to baking and want to develop their skills and creativity because we are a beginner’s site. While our audience includes any age group, we are targeting 18-35 year-olds, male or female who like to bake once in a while. Our audience wants to learn tips and tricks and they want to get to know the baking world in Chicago.

    They look for quick and easy recipes, how to’s, videos and baking tips. They would come to our site because we offer all of the above.

    Cristina Franco
    She is a student at St. Xavier University studying psychology. She likes to bake when she has time and mostly on the holidays or on special celebrations. She said the
    the page it drew her attention because it looked organized and appealing.

    “The first thing was the cake, it basically said what the page was about without words,” she said. “The colors in the page were very nice and the over all design was very creative.”

    “Something that might help improve this page would probably be to make some of the letters a little bit bigger,” she said. “Some of the links were very small and they might stand out better if they would be bold.”

    Raquel Torres
    She goes to Kendall College and she’s studying hotel management. She hopes to have her own steakhouse one day.

    “At first glance, it’s very nice! I like the home page a lot.”

    “I think having baking tips and recipes is a fantastic idea! Although I couldn’t check any of them out.”

    But I think what would make it even better is if you divided the bakery locations by their specialty, for example Molly’s Cupcakes, best cupcakes in Chicago, and then have a section for wedding cakes, theme cakes, cookies, and like Bittersweet is for fabulous desserts.

    I really like the idea that you focus on local businesses and give background info.

    Maybe have a section of top 10 recipes for the holidays

    Add a section of “healthy baking” for those that are health conscious? Like fat free baking, or low carb baking.

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